Author Topic: Updated photo of my ibogas  (Read 3408 times)

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Offline Stoney

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Updated photo of my ibogas
« on: December 08, 2011, 05:14:09 PM »
Its a little too close up and hard to see but there are 5 of them there. The biggest is about 2'. I had some flowers starting but the cooler weather caused the buds to drop. I'm hoping in the spring i'll have lots of flowers and seeds. I took them in on a cold night and took this pic.


Offline rho

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Re: Updated photo of my ibogas
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2011, 05:19:01 PM »
Very inspiring stoney! Do you have a good idea of how well they tolerate cooler drier temps once established?

keep up the good work

Offline Calaquendi

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Re: Updated photo of my ibogas
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2011, 10:30:18 PM »
Very nice indeed Stoney, thanks for the update and keep it up!
" I am you and what I see is me..."

Offline Stoney

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Re: Updated photo of my ibogas
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2011, 06:04:08 PM »
Thank you all. I'm in florida which is fairly humid. Cold they do not like a bit. I read that they stop growing when it gets below about 70f. I bring them in when it gets below about 55. Considering that these were all sprouted around the early part of the year, i'm lucky one tried to flower. I think, or hope, that i'll see a bunch of growth and lots of flowers in the spring. Then of course those seed pods.  I may try rooting cuttings in the summer after they are done setting seed. I heard they were a little hard to root but it can be done. There is always air layering.

OT but i was told by a gardener that avocado trees are the hardest to propagate. They wont take air layering. Grafting on a different plant does not work either. One thing that works is grafting a small branch from a mature tree onto an avocado seedling. The advantage is the plant is mature much faster and will set fruit.