Eboka.Info

Eboka Science => Eboka Cultivation => Topic started by: Eon T McKnight on March 23, 2010, 01:45:53 PM

Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Eon T McKnight on March 23, 2010, 01:45:53 PM
Before testing the feasibility of aeroponics, a source of T. iboga would be required.  I have found some seeds at CocaRickey's headshop in Canada  --  $140 for 10!   Yikes!!!  And no guarantee that any will germinate.

Another source is:     http://www.shamanic-extracts.com/xcart/shamanic-ethnobotanicals/iboga/

They sell 10 seeds for $45, a far more reasonable price, especially considering the reported low rate of germination.  Does anyone have experience with Shamanic Extracts?

Below is a cultivation guide that I found on the web.  Since exact copies were found on different sites, I do not believe that I am violating any copyright laws by posting it here.

If anyone proceeds down the aeroponics path, I will appreciate hearing about your results  --  good or bad.

~eon

Tabernanthe iboga propagation

Light & temperature requirements
Tabernanthe iboga is at home in the rainforests of West Africa. Temperatures here are always above 20deg C and frequently above 40 deg C. In fcat, iboga stops growing at about 15 deg C and looses it's leaves at about 10 deg C. The tips start dying back if exposed to 5 deg C. Repeated exposure to 4 deg C will cause severe dieback from which the plant may not recover. A sinlge frost or a couple of nights at 1 or 2 deg C will certainly kill most plants.
The rainforest provides a very moist and humid environment. Iboga plant will adapt to dry air, but will shed their leavs first. The new leaves will be smaller and tougher, but will withstand very dry conditions as long as the plant is watered frequently. Hardened iboga plants can be grown under HPS or other artificial lights. Being rainforest plants they prefer light at levels of less than 70%. Iboga ideally likes about 50% until it is a couple of years old and can then tolerate more. having such low minimum light requirements means that this species can easily be grown along the perimeter of artificial light rigs, where other plants will not be happy. It is also well suited as an indoor pot plant, but should be kept away from windowsills during winter.

Soil, water and nutrient requirements
Rainforests produce water by causing condensation of moist air in the lower strata of the forest. This keeps the rainforest floor damp at all times. The constant flushing of condensed water means that nutrients are constantly washed away. Most rainforest plants are well adapted to efficiently capture these nutrients in the upper layers of the forest litter and soil. When cultivating plant we should try to emulate this soil by using a light mix of leafmould or composted bark shreddings. Rainforest soils have perfect drainage and this can be a problem in commercial potting mixes. To avoid waterlogging it is wise to add at least 1/3rd coarse sand to the mix. Iboga quickly gets rootbound and needs plenty of space. The efficient rootsystem is also very vigorous and needs rooms to spread. Iboga is a heavy feeder and responds quickly to fertilising. Soluble fertilisers are a waste here due to high water requirement. Composted manures are perfect.

Natural propagation and germinating seed
There was a fair bit of seed available until the end of 1999. Most of this was supplied to retailers by Dan Lieberman (South Africa) who tragically died in a car accident mid 2000. Most seed sold around the world since then has been from old stock. Shaman Australis has now sourced a new supplier and is making seed available on a seasonal basis. Iboga seed is VERY perishable. In poor storage conditions it can loose it's viability within a few weeks. If kept at optimum conditions it will last about 4 months. To store seed properly it needs to be stored in a moist environment at about 10 degC. This prevents the seedcoat from drying out. Very fresh and moist iboga seed germinates easily and without problems. As soon as the coat dries somewhat the seedling will struggle to emerge from the seedcoat and may rot. The seedling can be assisted by keeping the seedcoat very moist and soft, or by using a scalpel to carefully remove sections of seedcoat on a day by day basis. A piece of wet cotton or fabric can be used to keep the seedcoat moist by draping it over the emerging seedling. A high humidity environment (humidity dome or tropical hothouse) is essential. If using a scalpel to help the seed it is important never to injure the cotyledons that are folded into the tiny folds of the seedcoat. Accessing 1mm per day is all that is needed and prevents excessive damage. As you ease the constriction with the scalpel, the seedling will slowly push itself out a little further, thus revealing the next safe place to cut another 1mm. trying to remove the whole seedcoat at once is almost guaranteed to fail. You should aim to remove the seedcoat within about a week of the seedling emerging from the growing medium, as any longer may weaken the seedling beyond recovery. Under normal circumstances the seedling will shed the seedcoat within 2 days and this is the minimum it should be allowed to try without interference.

To germinate the seed you will need to prepare a tray, pot or punnet with coarse sharp sand (please look up the exact preparation, as most other media and plain sand are entirely unsuitable). The punnet, pot or tray has to be perfectly free draining, which can be achieved by placing plastic shadecloth in the bottom to prevent the sand from escaping. The sand has to be at least 5cm deep. Place the seed in the coarse sharp sand about 10mm deep and water well. Never let the sand dry out, as if the seedling is about to emerge at this time it will dry up and die. Also, if the medium dries, the seedcoat may dry and prolong germination. Keep seed at a minimum 25 deg C air temp. However, to achieve good germination the air temp should be about 30-35 deg C. Lowering the temperature will delay germination and increase likelyhood of fungal attack. Germination may occur within a few days, but may take up to several months, so be prepared to keep looking after the seeds throughout their full germination phase. Never expose seedlings to dry air until they have at least 3 sets of leaves. This is also the best age to transplant the first time. Their first new growing medium should be mostly sand (90% coarse sand + 10% good potting mix) and should not contain ANY manure or other strong fertiliser. Osmocote is a good option here, but should be applied at minimal rate. Once the plants get to 5 pairs of leaves they are ready for strong growth and normal fertilising and should be potted into a mix as described in the section above.

Striking cuttings
Iboga cuttings are fairly easy to root. Take a stem section with two nodes. Remove the leaves from the lower node and cut off 2/3rds of each remaining leaf. Now insert the lower end into a tray or pot of coarse sharp sand. Rooting hormone makes no difference in this process. Put the pot or tray in a hothouse or humidity dome and keep moist, humid and very warm. Callus forms after about 10 days and roots emerge after another few days. Pot into a sandy potting mix after 4-6 weeks or when the plant has grown by another node.
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Calaquendi on March 24, 2010, 12:11:41 AM
Christ, that sounds hard...

Even growing this in soil is apparently crazy. What the hell happened to: put a seed in dirt, water, grow? Maybe I miss the point? Maybe God makes it difficult to grow so that only the 'right' people cultivate it...meaning those with honorable intentions, not some kid with too much time on his hands and a list of psychoactive plants from the internet. Still..work sucks.
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Eon T McKnight on March 24, 2010, 12:28:41 AM
Well, Cal, ya gotta remember that there are people out there who are not slackers.  And thank the Goddess for that, otherwise people like us would be in deep caca...    ~et
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: x on March 28, 2010, 12:54:07 AM
I am going to ask a friend what he can share about growing conditions. I think it's a great idea, and I have no experience, here.

Let's talk seeds if this still seems doable.

On sprouting, poppycock. I did it, and it wasn't hard. 2/5 ratio.

I wonder if anyone has done this yet.

T
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 07, 2010, 11:42:56 PM
I found another source for T. Iboga Seeds, not sure if anyone has had experience with this supplier from Australia.  5 seeds for 9.99 AU dollar, which is around $11-12 for 5. Doesn't sound too bad.  They won't ship live plants out of Australia, but seeds are no problem.  I got a confirmation from the seller.  Shipping is a little steep at $15 international, but it may be worth it if they germinate.

http://www.herbalistics.com.au/shop/product_info.php?cPath=3_13&products_id=633

I was giving serious thought to Hydroponics.  
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Calaquendi on April 08, 2010, 01:05:17 AM
Always good to see you fallout! Thanks for the heads up, that's about the best prices I have seen. I'm going to ask a friend of mine who is a vendor, if I can find a secure source there, I will share the good news.
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Eon T McKnight on April 08, 2010, 08:52:55 AM
Yeah, thanks fallout!

If you are interested in aeroponics, here is a link to DIY Aeroponics:

    http://forum.grasscity.com/advanced-growing-techniques/239837-how-diy-aeroponics.html

Too bad the person used his setup to grow that vile deadly weed, cannabis, which he will undoubtedly sell to school kids to get them hooked...   :D

What I have seen on the web re: eboka is that getting fresh seeds in the pod results in higher germination rates than using loose seeds.  So it might be necessary to start 10 just to get one  --  no telling how long they may have sat on the shelf.

~et

PS  --  I think that having the root chamber vertical instead of horizontal would encourage more root growth.  ~e
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 08, 2010, 11:36:24 AM
Good info. Eon, thanks for the advice!  Always good to hear from you Cal!

Peace Guys!
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: x on April 08, 2010, 08:03:02 PM
Eon, on germinating, call me when you're ready to try. It's Not That Hard.

Seriously!

Tia
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Eon T McKnight on April 09, 2010, 03:38:20 PM
Thanks, Tia!

I have no current plans to grow anything new at this time  --  my future is too uncertain.  I cannot bear the thought of bringing some beautiful little sprouts into this cruel world only to abandon them... (sob sob)

~e
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: roach on April 27, 2010, 09:00:30 AM
I planted 80 seeds that were 6 months old and 30-36 seeds germinated 3-5 weeks later. I used moist vermiculite to remove the seed coats that that were stuck on the plants. Almost 12 months to the day 4-5 plants started to flower, the plants were about 1 foot tall. Now the plants are 1 year 9 months old and there are roots coming out of the stems all over and cuttings will be made soon.

I will try to get pics and post them. If anyone needs seeds I will have 3000 fresh seeds within 1-3 weeks. Feel free to PM me.

-roach
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: GratefulDad on April 27, 2010, 09:28:03 AM
Welcome roach!  That's very kind of you!  I am interested in hearing whatever you have to say about your cultivation experience, and would probably be interested in the seeds, as well.  It would be awesome if you could snap a few pics, even, if at all possible.  Thanks a bunch!
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: x on April 27, 2010, 12:27:26 PM
roach!

Wow, welcome and thanks! I'm interested in how you used vermiculite to remove seed coats. What I did was just sprayed them often during the day to keep the coats moist enough to come off easily.

I am so very happy to hear there are folks growing. It's been a niggle in the back of my head since I learned about ibo that we are using a finite African resource.

I heard from a friend that the plants do indeed flower early, glad to be learning more.

peace
T
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 27, 2010, 12:40:23 PM
Yes, welcome roach. 

Could you expand on your germination process.  I'm all open for tips myself.  Did you use an artificial lighting source? Did you use a humidity chamber? What type of soil did you use...or was it hydroponics?  Sorry for all the questions, I'm just curious and wanting to learn.  I recently attained 10 seeds and am starting the germination process.  I basically followed Tia's process of using Organic Potting soil and placing some Sphagnum peat moss on top of the seeds as well as using an artificial lightening source during the day.  I also made a small humidity chamber with pure perlite at the bottom of the chamber and then placing the pot with the seeds within this chamber on top of the perlite. Perlite does hold water very well, so I thought using this would help the overall humidity within the chamber.

Tia and anyone else: Is using perlite going to far in adding humidity?

Thanks
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: GratefulDad on April 27, 2010, 01:51:31 PM
I haven't grown iboga, but I know using perlite in a dome will keep humidity high, and probably a few nice fresh air exchanges and mistings a day would be good, so they could breathe.
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Calaquendi on April 27, 2010, 03:22:48 PM
Thanks roach - welcome. Be interested in hearing how the cuttings take too!
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 27, 2010, 03:51:46 PM
Thanks GratefulDad, I certainly have air exchange holes at the bottom of the chamber, as well as some on the top plastic wrap that is covering it.  Thanks for your response.

Same here Cal, would like to hear how they grow roach.

Peace
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Eon T McKnight on April 27, 2010, 07:20:09 PM
Ja mon, cuttings would be berry berry cool! 

Just saw it written that both the primary (tap) root and secondary (feeder) roots are used for their medico-spiritual properties in Africa.  (Dang, shoulda got the link!)  Am wondering:  Would it be possible to do root-division with a bunch of feeder roots?

The only sad news is that it takes from 3 to 4 years for plants to get to minimal size in their home environment.

Has anyone heard about 'rock iboga' that grows on top of a rock?  Wonder what kind of rock is preferred?  Thinking it might be possible to set up a plant on top of a rock, bonsai style, and use hydro/aero-ponics...

Good to meet you, roach!  As you can see, many of us found your post very interesting.

Welcome!

Eon

Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 27, 2010, 08:45:16 PM
Sounds very interesting Eon, I was wondering myself in regards to germination on top of a rock based substrate in some sense.  Looks like Hydo/aero-poincs would be a very cool experiment.
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: roach on April 28, 2010, 02:13:33 AM
Hey everyone,

Germination Process:

Seeds were planted into Jiffy pellets and put into a standard 72 compartment propagation chamber such as the one found here

http://www.atlantishydroponics.com/Plant-Propagation-Tools/Viagrow-Complete-Propagation-and-Cloning-Kit.asp

I'm not a fan of the Jiffy pellets but it was all I had at the time. One advantage of using Jiffy pellets over soil or a potting mix was that I could check each pellet to see if the root was starting to come out the bottem and remove a bit of the soil from the top so the seed head didn't get stuck.

The propagation chamber was placed on a heat mat ( http://www.atlantishydroponics.com/Plant-Propagation-Tools/Super-Sprouter-Super-Sprouter-Seedling-Heat-Mat-10x21.asp ) and Sun Blaster 54 watt lights were turned on for 24 hours a day. After 3 weeks iboga sprouts started to pop out of the soil.

If the seed coat didn't come off by itself take moist vermiculite and cover the seed head for 12-24 hours. Shake or dust off the vermiculte then slowly remove the seed coat with your fingers. A small amount of force is used. Becareful not to rip the young sprout in half.

5-6 weeks later the seedlings will planted into 8 inch pots and placed inside a mini greenhouse. I have a fogger setup to come on for 8 seconds every 10 min, the lights are left on 24 hours a day and the door is open a bit for fresh air.

Hope this helps. I should be able to get pics within a 2-4 weeks. 

-roach

PS I live in Canada and T.iboga is legal here.
Title: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 28, 2010, 10:37:49 AM
Thanks for link to the germination chamber and additional information roach, peace! 
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Calaquendi on April 28, 2010, 11:15:17 PM
I've split the "Hydroponics" thread because we were getting off on a different topic: and one I'd like to see have its own discussion.

So, if there are any more ideas considering germination teks, cuttings, etc. we can now post them here. I'd love to see more on this, and hopefully soon we can see a grow log. Thanks, Cal.
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 28, 2010, 11:27:41 PM
Very good Cal, thanks. 
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: x on April 29, 2010, 10:22:11 AM
Thanks, roach.

The method I used was passed on to me, I germinated 3/5, ended up with two. Unfortunately, they were fried when a loving helper changed the bulb for me using a much higher wattage. It happens.

I got a clear plastic tub with lid and mutilated a desk lamp to fit into it, cord out the hole in the bottom.

I put the seeds in a small terra cotta pot. Moistened organic potting soil 3/4 up the pot, the seeds placed on top, not pushed in, not covered. On top of that some sphagnum moss, about an inch and a half. Kept the moss moist with a spray bottle.

I would take the lid off the makeshift terrarium during the day, well, not off, but agley, for air circulation. At night I would leave the smallest crack to preserve heat.

I learned about misting the seedcoat from the first sprout. The seed coat was hard and dry, I didn't think I should mess with it, though. I'd kept the environment moist enough, I thought, but apparently not. I would spray the sides of the terrarium a couple times a day. The first sprout withereed in it's coat. The next two did great, was misting with a spray bottle a few times a day.

Mold was a small issue initially. I put a drop of hydrogen peroxide on the seeds, let it sit about a minute, then rinsed them.

Tia
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 29, 2010, 12:21:02 PM
I"m wondering if I'm introducing too much humidity within the chamber with the Perlite at the bottom.  I guess I'll find out  :o

Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: roach on April 29, 2010, 03:47:22 PM
The humidity should be fine as long as you have the heat.
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on April 29, 2010, 10:26:23 PM
Sounds good roach, heating pad is taking care of that.  I realize also that airflow is important to prevent harmful fungus.
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Nganga Nobunoni + on June 20, 2010, 05:01:52 AM
Loving this thread folks' Awesome stuff' am looking forewards to seeing some pics of these darling little plants'

Much good energies to you all'

Bliss!

Nobu +
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on June 20, 2010, 02:04:36 PM
Beautiful plant  :D

So far only 1 germinated, but I'm thankful!



Thanks
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: Calaquendi on June 23, 2010, 11:35:03 PM
Awesome fallout! Keep up the good work!
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on June 23, 2010, 11:49:33 PM
Beautiful plant  :D

So far only 1 germinated, but I'm thankful!



Thanks


Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: GratefulDad on June 24, 2010, 03:04:40 AM
Gorgeous!!!  Keep that beauty humid, and loved!  And keep up the good work!
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: goatboy on June 24, 2010, 09:01:53 AM
Love it!

Nice job Fallout
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on June 24, 2010, 12:53:52 PM
Very much humid and loved  ;D

thanks goatboy
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: atom on October 17, 2010, 01:07:02 AM
Tia in particular, anyone else, has your, 1 left lived on to tell? How old now and have you or anyone else taken cuttings? And what was the wattage of the initial (prior to the well intentioned change) artificial light source?
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: x on October 17, 2010, 04:56:59 PM
I'm a killer. :(
But the initial wattage was 25.
Title: Re: Germination of T.iboga Seeds
Post by: fallout330 on October 18, 2010, 12:07:10 AM
Unfortunately I left mine outside for about an hour in the pot during July weather.....very bad mistake, the roots burned, it dried up and never recovered  :'(

I'll have to try again in the spring!

I certainly used an artificial light source and a heating pad, and was growing very well, prior to my mistake.