Author Topic: microdosing and flooding  (Read 3410 times)

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Offline TANYA

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microdosing and flooding
« on: September 02, 2012, 02:54:33 AM »
Hi everyone i hope you all are doing good, long time, no posting!!......I wanted to ask you guys a question: do any of you know about a situation where someone has a really difficult time microdosing (depression, anger being brought out) and then has a good flood? or as good as a flood can be? or is it the case that when someone has a hellish time microdosing, the same terrible experience will hold true in a flood? thanks so much guys! :D

Iboga Panacea

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Re: microdosing and flooding
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2012, 04:59:47 PM »
Tricky question to answer.  The bottom line to your question's answer is yes the flood will rid the complications associated with micro dosing or taking moderate doses of Iboga.  It is tricky because the experience of flooding itself I personally find to be the most difficult and rigorous thing possible.  But the results and say 2-3 days after words are when the heavenly noribogaine begins to trickle and perculate through.  I always find the actual night of the flood (first 8 hours) to be a huge test and difficult challange.  The next day is also difficult from my experience.  But then when I get sleep the first time, almost always about 30 hours after my flood, then I am reset revived happy outgoing and loving.  But it just keeps getting better from there as long as your extremely careful of what you put in you body.  Boosters also help to integrate the teaching you got from the flood.  And it is a rather longstanding tradition on this forum that says 3 days-1week after your flood to take a moderate amount of mush to be granted an affectatious glow of happiness onto your glow of Ibo. 

See if your truly comfortable with it.  Mind you your teetering a fine line and Iboga isn't right for a lot of people.  From all your accounts I personally would not treat someone on your level of iffyness but that doesn't mean you shouldn't consider doing it if you feel sound and grounded in your confidence that it is for you. 

Offline TANYA

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Re: microdosing and flooding
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2012, 03:03:29 AM »
Hi Thankyou so much for your reply. you said alot of good, thought provoking things. what would be your reason for not giving me iboga? would i have more potential then others to really loose it during a flood? thanks so much.

Iboga Panacea

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Re: microdosing and flooding
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2012, 11:02:27 PM »
Yeah it's just the iffy factor in my opinion that makes it risky.  I don't think we know enough about Iboga and mental issues yet, and for that reason I think it is dangerous.  Certainly I am just siding for caution here and by all means if you can find a reliable and experienced provider go with your heart.  But for your case I would strongly suggest you not try the DIY approach.  Too many variables and I can't say enough about what a force Iboga is to be reckoned with.  It means healing business, but if the mind fights there could be some breaks in the neural chemistry I think. 

Offline GratefulDad

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Re: microdosing and flooding
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2012, 06:59:29 PM »
He makes a great point TANYA.  I would not want to give you iboga because you are so worried about the trip.  A trip only lasts for the period of time it does, and then it's over, and most people, even if they're scared, understand this, so they just do it.  You seem so worried about this aspect, that you could freak yourself out, because you kind of expect it.  The worrying about freaking out is what causes freak outs, and this can often make an unpleasant trip much more serious.  You seem to already think you are permanently damaged from taking little doses, as one of your posts says it in the title..  I think that a lot of symptoms might just be in your head, but I can only guess.

People trick themselves into thinking all sorts of things, and that is why psychedelics can be dangerous for some.  It's rare, and unfortunate, but it does happen, and I would bet that nine times out of ten, it's because someone can't let go of the worry.  This causes irrational thinking and fear, and probably won't benefit the user.  Sometimes these difficult experiences actually teach people the most about themselves, but that is for people who aren't too afraid to face these things.  If you are too afraid to face these things, bringing them to the surface isn't going to help.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2012, 07:01:45 PM by GratefulDad »
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Offline DR Pockets

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Re: microdosing and flooding
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2012, 11:17:55 AM »
Sorry to respond so belatedly, but I wanted to chime in. Let me say first that I agree with kp. It is worth noting that psychedelics amplify your sensorium and he interminable chatter in your mind, whatever else may happen. If you are beholden to fear, or even to your opinions, you may be in for a difficult time. However, its also worth noting that many an opiate addict has successfully flooded ibogaine, with life changing results, and, let's face it,, if youre a junkie, you're addled with anxiety at all times, as is our wont. If you're not, the point stands, that your state of mind now, will not necessarily determine your state of mind later. I don't presume to speak on anyone else's behalf, but there seems to be a tendency toward 'waking up' under psychedelic influence. That doesn't apply to all people at all times, but the possibility does. The most helpful action you can take in preparation for any psychedelic experience is to meditate. I want to be clear about what I mean, because to sit cross legged touching fingertips is the least important, possibly altogether unimportant part. What I mean by meditation is practicing awareness. The way to become aware is to still your mind. The mind doesn't attend well without a goal, but the act of trying to attain is prohibitive. So, how is it possible to focus on nothing? Listen. Do not reach through your ears with your mind to actively look for identifiable sounds. Let your mind sit still between your ears for the moment, and allow the myriad pressure waves reach your ear. This is passive listening. Do not label what you hear, don't linger on any sound. Sit outside if you can. Allow your mind to follow your breath, as it enters your lungs, passes into your bloodstream, spreads throughout your body, oxygenating your cells, absorbing toxins, and back out. You notice that your internal monologue is jabbering away, incessantly. Do not try to silence these thoughts. It won't work, and you'll get frustrated. Listen to this chatter with thewame detached passivity as with every other sound. Listen with your other senses in the same way. Remember, this is practice. It will take time to quell fear and get control if your feelings. The way to get control, is to relinquish it. You don't think about every muscle contacting individually when you move your body. That would be insane, not to mention impossible to coordinate. Likewise, you don't need to micromqnge your thoughts and emotions. Both will happen automatically regardless of anything you do. The issue then, is not making your mind bene to your who's whim, but accepting your experiences as they arise, and allowing them to pass. Over time, not that much, really, the quality of your experiences will improve, and therefore the quality of your life, including how you experience your memories. I wish you well. And, yes, I have experienced bursts of anger while microdosing. Just go with it, and don't act on it.
If you can put your five fingers through it, it is a gate, if not a door. Shut your eyes and see.

        from 'Ulysses' by James Joyce